IB History Paper 2 and 3 Markscheme

Timothy Hoffmann

One of our most experienced History tutors, Graham Lacey, is on hand to give you his top tops for conquering the (notoriously) most difficult IB subject of them all – History!

In the thirty years in which Graham has been in the teaching profession, the IB has been the driving force behind his work: He has not only continually taught History HL and SL throughout his career, but during his time as Deputy Head Academic at Sevenoaks School in the UK he helped to develop the programme and establish the school’s reputation as one of the top IB schools in the world. For all his commitment to managing and developing the IB programme, Graham remains deeply committed to teaching History, his passion for which he successfully infects his students.

 

Here Graham takes you through his interpretation of the IB History paper 2 and 3 markschemes!

4-6

7-9

10-12

13-15

1. Addressing the demands of the question

The answer indicates some understanding of the demands of the question.

The answer indicates and understanding of the demands of the question, but these demands are only partially addressed.

The demands of the question are understood and addressed.

Answers are clearly focused, showing a high degree of awareness of the demands and implications of the question

2. Historical Knowledge

Knowledge is demonstrated but lacks accuracy and relevance.

Relevant, mostly accurate and appropriate historical knowledge is present and applied as evidence.

Events are generally placed in their historical context.

Knowledge is accurate and relevant. Events are placed in their historical context, and there is clear understanding of historical concepts.

Examples used are appropriate and relevant, and are used to support the analysis/argument.

Knowledge is detailed, accurate and relevant. Events are placed in their historical context.

There is a clear understanding of historical concepts. Examples used are appropriate and relevant, and are used effectively to support the analysis/argument.

3. Critical analysis and interpretations

Answers are presented in a narrative or descriptive manner rather than analytical.

The answer moves beyond description to include some analysis or critical commentary but this is not sustained.

Arguments are mainly clear and coherent. There is some awareness and evaluation of different perspectives. The response contains critical analysis. Most of the main points are substantiated, and the answer argues to a consistent conclusion.

Arguments are clear and coherent. There is evaluation of different perspectives, and this evaluation is effectively integrated into the answer. The answer contains well- developed critical analysis. All, or nearly all, of the main points are substantiated, and the response argues to a reasoned conclusion.

4. Use of historical skills: structure, use of evidence, evaluation & explanation.

There may be an attempt to follow a structured approach, the answer lacks clarity or coherence.

There is an attempt to follow a structured approach although there may be some repetition or lack of clarity in places.

Answers are generally well structured and organised.

Answers are well structured and clearly expressed, balanced and well organised.