IB Tutor Interviews: Rebecca

Timothy Hoffmann

Tutor: Rebecca Brown  

IBDP score: 36 (6,6,7 in HL Psychology, HL Chinese A2, and HL History)

University: B.A in History and German, New York University

               M.A in Comparative Literature, King’s College London

Subjects: HL/SL History, HL/SL English (Language and literature)

In our Tutor Interview series we put the spotlight on members of our outstanding tutoring team. From IB graduates to teachers and Examiners, we share their stories and their advice about the International Baccalaureate to help you make your own IB a success.

 

Why did you choose to do the IB? 

I wanted to become a well-rounded student, and the IB provided that for me, as I was able to explore many different subjects at once. I also wanted to enhance my own writing and critical thinking skills, in which the IB provided that challenge for me due to the way the exams were formatted.

What did you enjoy about the IB? 

I enjoyed the challenge and the range of subjects I have studied. I also loved the depth and critical approaches the teachers provide, which helped me greatly in my undergraduate and postgraduate studies.

What was the most challenging part of the IB? 

I had many strengths but I was terrible in a few subject such as maths and biology, which brought my mark down greatly. I think the difficulty is to find balance to revise on all subjects, including TOK, CAS and EE, and I was greatly overwhelmed.  However, I think it’s an invaluable experience because it has taught me so much about failure and time management, which are necessary skills for the future when you are in university.

What did you do for your CAS/TOK/EE? 

For my CAS I focused on volunteering in organisations that embraces Chinese Culture and also my interest in martial arts (Taekwondo) and figure skating. For my TOK I wrote about the strengths and limitations of historiography in our pursuit of the knowledge of history. My extended essay focused on disputing and analysing historian Niall Ferguson’s book, The Pity of War: Explaining World War I, in which he attributed the blame of World War I to England.